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Emergency Preparedness

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  • 08/06/2015 5:38 PM | BOMA New Jersey (Administrator)

    ELECTRIC

    WATER

    Atlantic City Electric

    800-642-3780

    Aqua New Jersey, Inc.

    877-987-2782

    Jersey Central Power & Light

    800-662-3115

    Berlin Water Department

    856-767-0056

    Orange Rockland Electric

    877-434-4100

    Bordentown City

    609-298-0604

    PSE&G

    800-436-7734

    Clinton Water Department

    98-735-2265

    Dover Water Commission

    973-366-4662

    GAS

    Fayson Lakes Water Company

    973-838-6226

    Elizabethtown Gas

    800-242-5830

    Forest Lakes Water Company

    973-786-6600

    *to report a gas leak

    800-492-4009

    Gordon's Corner Water Company

    732-946-9333

    New Jersey Natural Gas

    800-221-0051

    Lake Lenape Water Company

    973-786-7412

    *to report a gas leak

    800-427-5325

    Middlesex Water Company

    732-634-1500

    PSE&G

    800-436-7734

    Midtown Water Company

    732-679-1600

    *to report a gas leak

    800-436-7734

    Montague Water Company

    800-272-1919

    South Jersey Gas

    888-766-9900

    Mount Olive Villages Water Company

    973-293-8059

    *to report a gas leak

    800-582-7060

    NJ American Water

    800-652-6987

    Park Ridge Water Department

    201-391-2129

    CABLE

    Pinelands Water Company

    732-634-1500

    Cablevision

    866-575-8000

    Ridgewood Water Department

    201-670-5521

    Comcast

    800-266-2278

    Roxbury Water Company

    973-584-4118

    Hometown Online

    800-952-7642

    Roxiticus Water Company

    877-431-3999

    Service Elec Cable TV of Hunterdon

    800-225-9102

    SB Water Company

    856-354-2273

    Service Elec Cable TV of NJ

    800-992-0132

    Seaview Harbor Water Company

    215-643-5105

    Time Warner Cable

    201-886-0900

    Shore Water Company, Inc.

    732-793-0767

    Verizon FIOS

    888-438-3467

    Shorelands Water Company

    732-264-5510

    Simmons Water Company

    973-875-4133

    WASTEWATER

    Trenton Water Department

    609-989-3055

    Andover Utility Co., Inc.

    201-460-9069

    United Water New Jersey

    800-422-5987

    Aqua NJ (Woolrich & Maxim Systems)

    877-987-2782

    United Water - Toms River

    732-349-0227

    Atlantic City Sewerage Company

    609-345-0131

    Environmental Disposal Corporation

    877-725-0693

    Montague Sewer (sub of Utilities, Inc)

    800-272-1919

    Montague Sewer (sub of Utilities, Inc)

    866-277-5515

    Mount Olive Villages Sewer Company

    908-654-4360

    NJ American Water (Sewer System)

    Ocean City

    800-652-6987

    Lakewood

    800-652-6987

    Howell & Freehold

    800-652-6987

    Tewsbury Twp & part of Pottersville

    800-272-1325

    Oakwaood Village Sewerage

    443-257-0087

    Pinelands Wastewater Company

    732-634-1500

    SB Sewer Company

    856-354-2273

    United Water Princeton Meadows

    888-770-6030

    United Water Vernon Sewerage, Inc.

    888-770-6030

    United Water West Milford

    888-770-6030

    Wallkill Sewer Company

    973-827-6676

  • 08/06/2015 5:33 PM | BOMA New Jersey (Administrator)

     

    Submitted by BOMA New York

    8/2015

    Updated 07/29/2015

    NYC Health

    Legionnaires' Disease Frequently Asked Questions

    What is Legionnaires' disease?

    Legionnaires' disease (or Legionellosis) is a type of pneumonia. It is caused by a type of bacteria (Legionella) that grows in warm water.

    Is the disease contagious?

    No. Legionnaires' disease is not spread from person to person. People only get sick by breathing in water vapor containing the bacteria (for example, by inhaling contaminated mist from faucets, showers, whirlpools or cooling towers). People who are sick cannot make others sick.

    Who is at risk?

    Groups at high risk include people who are middle-aged or older—especially cigarette smokers—people with chronic lung disease or weakened immune systems and people who take medicines that weaken their immune systems (immunosuppressive drugs).

    What are the symptoms of Legionnaires' Disease?

    Symptoms resemble other types of pneumonia and can include fever, chills, muscle aches and cough. Some people may also have headaches, fatigue, and loss of appetite, confusion or diarrhea.

    What should I do if I think I have Legionnaires' disease?

    If you have symptoms such as fever, chills and cough, call a doctor and get checked for pneumonia. If you have a medical condition that affects your breathing, like emphysema, or if you are a smoker, ask your doctor about testing for Legionnaires' disease.

    What is the treatment for Legionnaires' disease?

    The disease is treated with antibiotics. Most people get better with early treatment, although they may need to be hospitalized. In rare cases, people may get very sick or even die from complications of the disease.

    Updated 8/3/2015

    Health

    South Bronx Legionnaires' Disease Outbreak Frequently Asked Questions

    What is the difference between a water tank and a cooling tower?

    A cooling tower contains water and is used by some buildings as part of their air conditioning, ventilation and/or heating systems.

    A water tank is a totally separate system. Some taller buildings use a water tank to store water used for drinking, washing dishes and/or showering. No water tanks are associated with the current South Bronx outbreak.

    Is the tap water in the South Bronx safe to drink, wash and bathe with?

    Yes. It is safe to drink, wash and bathe with the tap water in the South Bronx and throughout the city.

    What has the Health Department done at the South Bronx buildings with cooling towers that tested positive for Legionella?

    There are five South Bronx buildings with cooling towers that tested positive for Legionella. These buildings have completed short-term cleaning and disinfection. The Health Department remains in constant contact with management at all five buildings and is working very closely with management on long-term procedures to keep those cooling towers free of Legionella.

    Is it safe for people to remain in the five buildings that tested positive for Legionella, especially if they continue to run their air conditioning systems?

    Yes. All cooling towers have been disinfected. That process immediately reduces or eliminates the likelihood of Legionella being released.

    Will the Health Commissioner issue an order for the entire South Bronx or the entire City requiring all buildings with cooling towers to disinfect and clean their cooling towers, regardless of whether the towers were inspected/tested for Legionella?

    The City is evaluating whether a wide-scale cleaning and disinfection program would be appropriate. Currently, only five buildings have tested positive for Legionella. All five have undergone rapid disinfection and cleaning. We will continue to monitor the outbreak and evaluate whether additional steps are necessary.

  • 08/06/2015 5:33 PM | BOMA New Jersey (Administrator)

     

    Lighting:

    o Lighting generates heat, which causes the HVAC to work even harder during hot summer days. Turn off unnecessary lights in the common areas to save electricity and reduce the workload of the air conditioning system.

    o Utilize occupancy sensors in private offices and low traffic areas of the buildings to automatically turn off lights when the areas are unoccupied.

    o If LED lamps are not currently feasible for the building, make sure fixtures are using compact fluorescent lamps versus incandescent lamps because incandescent lamps have a higher operating temperature.

    HVAC:

    o Turn off exhaust fans for a few hours each afternoon on days 85˚or above to prevent exhausting the cool air out of the building.

    o Raise the occupied cooling set point a degree or two (until tenant hot calls start coming in) to reduce the demand on the compressors thus reducing the energy draw on the utility while extending the useful life of the equipment.

    o Complete a summer start up inspection to ensure clean filters and replace worn belts, as needed, to increase the efficiency of the unit.

    Computers:

    o Turn off computer monitors when leaving a computer, even for a short time, since they typically consume about two-thirds of the total energy used by a computer.

    o Avoid using screensavers because they require a lot more electricity due to the constant run.

    o Encourage tenants to turn off ALL office equipment at night and on weekends, when not in use.

    Landscaping:

    o Landscaping can both beautify a property and reduce energy costs. Invest in deciduous trees on the South and West sides of a building, where the sun’s rays are most direct and intense. The trees provide shade during the summer months which helps to reduce the solar load in a building.

    Interior:

    o On high solar days, remind tenants to keep the blinds closed to reduce the solar load in an office.

    o Ask tenants to keep interior office doors open so the cool air flows freely throughout the suite.

    o Encourage tenants to use only Energy Star rated appliances equipment in their kitchens, and avoid running dishwashers during the day.

    Tenant education is crucial to successfully reducing a building’s energy requirements year round. All of these simple quick tips can help reduce a building’s heat load and peak utility demand requirements during the summer months. The benefit is two-fold because these tips also help the utility company maintain necessary commodity levels to its consumers without browning or blacking out areas.

  • 05/05/2014 6:58 PM | BOMA New Jersey (Administrator)

    Click here for the pdf of the Emergency Management Guide for Business and Industry

  • 05/05/2014 6:57 PM | BOMA New Jersey (Administrator)

    About NJOEM

    New Jersey County Office of Emergency Management Coordinators

    County Access and Functional Needs Liaisons (more info here): http://www.ready.nj.gov/plan/special-needs.html


    ·        Atlantic County

    ·        Bergen County

    ·        Burlington County

    ·        Camden County

    ·        Cape May County

    ·        Cumberland County

    ·        Essex County

    ·        Gloucester County

    ·        Hudson County

    ·        Hunterdon County

    ·        Mercer County

    ·        Middlesex County

    ·        Monmouth County

    ·        Morris County

    ·        Ocean County

    ·        Passaic County

    ·        Salem County

    ·        Somerset County

    ·        Sussex County

    ·        Union County

    ·        Warren County

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